Simon A. Flynn

Residual Affects of the Trapdoor Springfield Saint

“…in dialectical wildernesses demanded of me is verse.”

Simon

STRIGIFORM SCIENTIFIC

COLLEAGUES

I study to achieve an articulate synopsis of the grand human construct amidst political, cultural and biometric paradigms.

We all somehow participate in the harvest, extraction, consumption, combustion, construction, discarding and remediation and relegation to externality, of matter through systems, and we must move relative to this matter across these boundaries in the biosphere, for all of these purposes.

A correlary to my study of a primarily macroscopic perspective on resource utilization is a study of conflict generated by scarcity. Such are the systematics of how we sapiens will survive or may perish, due to famine, strife, finite natural resources depletion, or because of toxicities, or because of what equate to inter species competitions, primarily now in virology and Animalia, yet in truth throughout all life; within our own and nature’s biometric realities.

I like the idea of experimenting with lands and forests. Pictured, Glyphosate or Miracle Gro. I prefer reciprocating saws with demolition blades instead of chainsaws.
I very much want to cook dinner with a beautiful woman. Here is a still incomplete page of mine.

UT SEQUENS LINGUA

I’ve heard it said that the South was an un-oppressive agronomical caste system before mills at Lowell on the Merrimack and Biddeford on the Socco (Massachusetts bay colony) began supplying industrial quantities of cloth (and C. canadensis pelts) to European markets.

Call this sci-fi: 30yrs until terminal depletion is causal of a global transportation sector collapse and induces a US civil war as speciating virological threats continue, yet engineering failures prevent infinite electric volvos and soy fuel food logistics become increasingly seasonal relative to soy harvest. So, with no other transportation and US infrastructure dedicated to existing fuels chemistry internal combustion; coal liquification becomes the requisite economy of scale, and carbonic acid putrefies coastal ecosystems, halts the gyres, is causal of wild thermodynamic flux, and kills the ecosphere. 90% of sapiens die in the following century.